SUBURBAN WILDLIFE

One of the joys of living in the suburbs of South Florida is the amount of wildlife I can see in my very own backyard.  Some of it is exotic, some of it is ordinary, but it’s all fascinating to me.

My home backs up on a waterway, so I think I probably see more wild animals than many other folks who might only have a fence.  I’ve had the joys of seeing otters, raccoons, possum, turtles and other native wildlife in addition to some non-native but pervasive species like iguanas.  Here are a few photos that I’ve taken within the last couple of months.  Sorry for the shitty quality, I didn’t have my cell phone camera set quite right.

This "Cuban" or "knight" anole is not native to the United States, but is now ubiquitous in South Florida - particularly, Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties. He's not a serious threat to native species, but these suckers can grow to 18 inches long or more!
This “Cuban” or “knight” anole is not native to the United States, but is now ubiquitous in South Florida – particularly, Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties. He’s not a serious threat to native species, but these suckers can grow to 18 inches long or more!

 

This red-tailed hawk shit all over my car before being chased off by a nesting mockingbird. I'm pretty sure the hawk could kick the mockingbird's ass, but it probably wasn't worth the hassle.
This red-tailed hawk shit all over my car before being chased off by a nesting mockingbird. I’m pretty sure the hawk could kick the mockingbird’s ass, but it probably wasn’t worth the hassle.

 

Say hello to this mama raccoon and her four little ones. They came by for a drink of water from the canal behind my house. One of the babies got temporarily stuck in the low-hanging tree branch but he eventually found his way down.
Say hello to this mama raccoon and her four little ones. They came by for a drink of water from the canal behind my house. One of the babies got temporarily stuck in the low-hanging tree branch but he eventually found his way down.

 

this is snek. More specifically, this is a southern ring-neck snake I found in my driveway one morning. What you can't see in this photo is the bright orange underbelly that he showed to me when I got too close - these little fellas like to lift their tails to show you how "dangerous" they are. Joke's on him, though, because I wasn't scared at all and shooed him into the grass.
this is snek. More specifically, this is a southern ring-neck snake I found in my driveway one morning. What you can’t see in this photo is the bright orange underbelly that he showed to me when I got too close – these little fellas like to lift their tails to show you how “dangerous” they are. Joke’s on him, though, because I wasn’t scared at all and shooed him into the grass.

 

This little spider sets up a web in the same spot every evening, and every morning he takes it down. I've seen others like him, and I bet by the end of the summer he's going to be pretty big. I'm not sure, but I think it's probably an orb weaver of the Neoscona genus. What do I know, though? Do I look like Spider-Man?
This little spider sets up a web in the same spot every evening, and every morning he takes it down. I’ve seen others like him, and I bet by the end of the summer he’s going to be pretty big. I’m not sure, but I think it’s probably an orb weaver of the Neoscona genus. What do I know, though? Do I look like Spider-Man?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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